Opinion Review
Copyright ©The Author(s) 2021. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
World J Psychiatr. May 19, 2021; 11(5): 153-168
Published online May 19, 2021. doi: 10.5498/wjp.v11.i5.153
Use of cognitive event-related potentials in the management of psychiatric disorders: Towards an individual follow-up and multi-component clinical approach
Salvatore Campanella
Salvatore Campanella, Laboratoire de Psychologie Médicale et d’Addictologie, ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), CHU Brugmann-Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), Brussels 1020, Belgium
Author contributions: Campanella S is the sole author of the manuscript.
Conflict-of-interest statement: No relevant conflicts of interest to declare.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article that was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/Licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Corresponding author: Salvatore Campanella, PhD, Senior Research Associate FNRS, Laboratoire de Psychologie Médicale et d’Addictologie, ULB Neuroscience Institute (UNI), CHU Brugmann-Université Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), 4, Place Vangehuchten, Secrétariat de Psychiatrie, Brussels 1020, Belgium. salvatore.campanella@chu-brugmann.be
Received: January 22, 2021
Peer-review started: January 22, 2021
First decision: March 1, 2021
Revised: March 5, 2021
Accepted: April 14, 2021
Article in press: April 14, 2021
Published online: May 19, 2021
Core Tip

Core Tip: Despite decades of intense research and many promising results, cognitive event-related potentials (ERPs) have yet to be implemented in daily psychiatric care units as an add-on tool to psychotherapy and medication. I present here the main arguments supporting the notion that ERPs represent a highly suitable tool for performing individual “neuro-cognitive” assessments in psychiatric patients. Such ERP data could help clinicians to specify individual cognitive interventions that will target each patient’s specific needs, thus promoting an “individualized” or “personalized” medicine.