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Copyright ©The Author(s) 2017.
World J Dermatol. Nov 2, 2017; 6(4): 52-58
Published online Nov 2, 2017. doi: 10.5314/wjd.v6.i4.52
Figure 1
Figure 1 There is emerging evidence linking dermatological disorders to alterations in gut bacteria. Studies hypothesize intestinal flora produce neurotransmitters in response to stress that can modulate skin function. These neurotransmitters cross the intestinal epithelium enter the bloodstream and induce systemic effects. Along with neurotransmitters, the gut microflora also release short chain fatty acids (SCFAs), which can also enter systemic circulation and affect the skin. Additionally, diet may influence inflammation in the skin though nutrient signalling and release of long chain fatty acids, leading to excessive stimulation of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1 and increased synthesis of fatty acids and triglycerides promoting Propionibacterium acnes overgrowth.

Citation: Vaughn AR, Notay M, Clark AK, Sivamani RK. Skin-gut axis: The relationship between intestinal bacteria and skin health. World J Dermatol 2017; 6(4): 52-58