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World J Orthop. Apr 18, 2014; 5(2): 69-79
Published online Apr 18, 2014. doi: 10.5312/wjo.v5.i2.69
Muscle force and movement variability before and after total knee arthroplasty: A review
Jessica W Smith, Jesse C Christensen, Robin L Marcus, Paul C LaStayo
Jessica W Smith, Paul C LaStayo, Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1290, United States
Jessica W Smith, Jesse C Christensen, Robin L Marcus, Paul C LaStayo, Department of Physical Therapy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1290, United States
Paul C LaStayo, Department of Orthopedics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1290, United States
Paul C LaStayo, Department of Exercise and Sport Science, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1290, United States
Author contributions: Smith JW contributed significantly to the intellectual content, review of the literature, and overall organization of the manuscript, as well as wrote the majority of the manuscript; Christensen JC contributed significantly to the intellectual content, review of the literature, and overall organization of the manuscript, and assisted in the writing of the manuscript; Marcus RL and LaStayo PC contributed to the intellectual content and interpretation of data.
Correspondence to: Jessica W Smith, PhD, Department of Bioengineering, University of Utah, 201 Presidents Cir, Salt Lake City, UT 84108-1290, United States. j.smith@utah.ed
Telephone: +1-801-5567360 Fax: +1-801-6067441
Received: December 29, 2013
Revised: February 26, 2014
Accepted: March 11, 2014
Published online: April 18, 2014
Abstract

Variability in muscle force output and movement variability are important aspects of identifying individuals with mobility deficits, central nervous system impairments, and future risk of falling. This has been investigated in elderly healthy and impaired adults, as well as in adults with osteoarthritis (OA), but the question of whether the same correlations also apply to those who have undergone a surgical intervention such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) is still being investigated. While there is a growing body of literature identifying potential rehabilitation targets for individuals who have undergone TKA, it is important to first understand the underlying post-operative impairments to more efficiently target functional deficits that may lead to improved long-term outcomes. The purpose of this article is to review the potential role of muscle force output and movement variability in TKA recipients. The narrative review relies on existing literature in elderly healthy and impaired individuals, as well as in those with OA before and following TKA. The variables that may predict long-term functional abilities and deficits are discussed in the context of existing literature in healthy older adults and older adults with OA and following TKA, as well as the role future research in this field may play in providing evidence-based data for improved rehabilitation targets.

Keywords: Osteoarthritis, Elderly, Total knee arthroplasty, Movement variability

Core tip: Muscle force output and movement variability are important aspects of identifying individuals with mobility deficits, central nervous system impairments, as well as future risk of falling. These correlations have primarily been investigated in elderly healthy and impaired adults, as well as in adults with osteoarthritis (OA), but the question of whether the same correlations also apply to those who have undergone a surgical intervention such as total knee arthroplasty (TKA) are still being investigated. The variables that may predict long-term functional abilities and deficits are discussed in the context of existing literature in healthy older adults and older adults with OA and following TKA.