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World J Diabetes. Feb 15, 2015; 6(1): 167-174
Published online Feb 15, 2015. doi: 10.4239/wjd.v6.i1.167
Rare complications of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis
Shara R Bialo, Sungeeta Agrawal, Charlotte M Boney, Jose Bernardo Quintos
Shara R Bialo, Sungeeta Agrawal, Charlotte M Boney, Jose Bernardo Quintos, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology of Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, RI 02903, United States
Author contributions: All the authors solely contributed to this paper.
Conflict-of-interest: None of the authors have potential, perceived, or real conflict of interest to disclose.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Correspondence to: Jose Bernardo Quintos, MD, Division of Pediatric Endocrinology of Rhode Island Hospital, Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, 593 Eddy Street, MPSII, Providence, RI 02903, United States. jose_bernardo_quintos@brown.edu
Telephone: +1-401-4445504 Fax: +1-401-4442534
Received: August 29, 2014
Peer-review started: August 30, 2014
Revised: October 31, 2014
Accepted: December 16, 2014
Article in press: December 17, 2014
Published online: February 15, 2015
Core Tip

Core tip: Diabetic ketoacidosis is highly prevalent in pediatric patients with both newly diagnosed and established type 1 diabetes. The most common rare complication is cerebral edema, which is the leading cause of death in youth with diabetes. However, several other complications involving multiple systems have been described and can cause significant morbidity in cases of pediatric diabetic ketoacidosis, thus warranting awareness and targeted monitoring.