Basic Study
Copyright ©The Author(s) 2018. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
World J Gastroenterol. Apr 21, 2018; 24(15): 1622-1631
Published online Apr 21, 2018. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v24.i15.1622
Evaluation of safety for hepatectomy in a novel mouse model with nonalcoholic-steatohepatitis
Yusuke Ozawa, Takafumi Tamura, Yohei Owada, Yoshio Shimizu, Akira Kemmochi, Katsuji Hisakura, Takashi Matsuzaka, Hitoshi Shimano, Hiroko Isoda, Nobuhiro Ohkohchi
Yusuke Ozawa, Takafumi Tamura, Yohei Owada, Yoshio Shimizu, Akira Kemmochi, Katsuji Hisakura, Nobuhiro Ohkohchi, Department of Gastrointestinal and Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575, Japan
Takashi Matsuzaka, Hitoshi Shimano, Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8575, Japan
Hiroko Isoda, Faculty of Life and Environmental Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-8572, Japan
Author contributions: Ozawa Y and Tamura T designed the study and wrote the initial draft of the manuscript; Ozawa Y, Owada Y, Shimizu Y and Kemmochi A performed the animal experiments, the biochemical analysis and gene expression analysis; Ozawa Y, Tamura T, Matsuzaka T and Shimano H contributed to the analysis and interpretation of the data; all of the other authors have critically reviewed the manuscript; the final version of the manuscript was approved by all of the authors.
Supported by Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan, KAKENHI, No. 26861059 and No. 16K10489.
Institutional review board statement: Animal experiments were performed in accordance with the university’s Regulations for Animal Experiments and Fundamental Guidelines for Proper Conduct of Animal Experiment and Related Activities in Academic Research Institutions, under the jurisdiction of the Japanese Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology.
Institutional animal care and use committee statement: Animal experiments were performed in human manner after receiving approval from Institutional University Experiment Committee of University of Tsukuba (protocol number: 17-312).
Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors report no relevant conflicts of interest.
Data sharing statement: No data are available.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Correspondence to: Nobuhiro Ohkohchi, MD, PhD, Professor, Surgeon, Department of Gastrointestinal and Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba 305-8575, Japan. nokochi3@md.tsukuba.ac.jp
Telephone: +81-29-8533221 Fax: +81-29-8533222
Received: February 14, 2018
Peer-review started: February 14, 2018
First decision: March 9, 2018
Revised: March 16, 2018
Accepted: March 25, 2018
Article in press: March 25,2018
Published online: April 21, 2018
Core Tip

Core tip: We report whether the liver resection volume in the nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) model influences surgical outcome. The population of patients with NASH has been increasing. However, few animal models fully reflect both the histopathology and pathophysiology of NASH in humans. We established a novel experimental NASH model that exhibited the same characteristics as NASH in humans. This study elucidates the metabolism of the residual liver after a hepatectomy with NASH. Compared with normal liver, the residual NASH liver function is impaired, especially its regenerative ability. Therefore, a larger residual volume is required to maintain liver function in NASH liver after partial hepatectomy.