Brief Article
Copyright ©2009 The WJG Press and Baishideng. All rights reserved.
World J Gastroenterol. Oct 21, 2009; 15(39): 4919-4922
Published online Oct 21, 2009. doi: 10.3748/wjg.15.4919
Effects of fasting and preoperative feeding in children
Muslim Yurtcu, Engin Gunel, Tahir Kemal Sahin, Abdullah Sivrikaya
Muslim Yurtcu, Engin Gunel, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Meram Medical School of Selcuk University, Konya 42080, Turkey
Tahir Kemal Sahin, Department of Public Health, Meram Medical School of Selcuk University, Konya 42080, Turkey
Abdullah Sivrikaya, Department of Biochemistry, Meram Medical School of Selcuk University, Konya 42080, Turkey
Author contributions: Yurtcu M performed the majority of the clinical trials; Gunel E and Sahin TK were involved in editing the manuscript; Yurtcu M and Sivrikaya A co-ordinated and provided the collection of all the human material, in addition to providing financial support for the study; Yurtcu M, Gunel E, and Sahin TK designed the study and wrote the manuscript.
Supported by Department of Biochemistry, Meram Medical School of Selcuk University
Correspondence to: Dr. Muslim Yurtcu, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Meram Medical School of Selcuk University, Konya 42080, Turkey. muslimyurtcu@hotmail.com
Telephone: +90-332-2236546 Fax: +90-332-2237236
Received: August 5, 2009
Revised: August 21, 2009
Accepted: August 28, 2009
Published online: October 21, 2009
Abstract

AIM: To investigate whether children should undergo surgery without a long period of fasting after feeding.

METHODS: Eighty children with inguinoscrotal disorders (aged 1-10 years) were studied prospectively. They were divided into eight groups that each contained 10 children who were fed normal liquid food (NLF) and a high-calorie diet (HCD) 2, 3, 4 and 5 h before surgery, in two doses at 6-h intervals. NLF was given to four groups and HCD to the other four. In all groups, glucose, prealbumin and cortisol levels in the blood were measured twice: just after oral feeding and just before the operation. After the establishment of adequate anesthesia, gastric residue liquid was measured with a syringe.

RESULTS: Blood glucose levels in all patients fed NLF and HCD were high, except in patients in the HCD-4 group. There was no significant difference in the blood prealbumin levels. There was a significant increase in the blood cortisol levels in the NLF-2 (14.4 ± 5.7), HCD-2 (13.2 ± 6.0), NLF-3 (10.9 ± 6.4), and HCD-5 (6.8 ± 5.7) groups (P < 0.05).

CONCLUSION: The stress of surgery may be tolerated by children when they are fed up to 2 h before elective surgery.

Keywords: Cortisol, Diet, Fasting, Food, Glucose, Liquids, Prealbumin