Minireviews
Copyright ©2014 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.
World J Surg Proced. Mar 28, 2014; 4(1): 1-8
Published online Mar 28, 2014. doi: 10.5412/wjsp.v4.i1.1
Outcomes of continuous flow ventricular assist devices
Shelly Bansal, Chittoor B Sai-Sudhakar, Bryan A Whitson
Shelly Bansal, Division of Thoracic Transplantation, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, United States
Chittoor B Sai-Sudhakar, Division of Cardiac Surgery, Department of Surgery, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
Bryan A Whitson, Division of Cardiac Surgery, The Collaboration for Organ Perfusion, Protection, Engineering and Regeneration (COPPER) Laboratory, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus, OH 43210, United States
Author contributions: Bansal S, Sai-Sudhakar CB, and Whitson BA contributed equally to this works authorship and revision.
Correspondence to: Bryan A Whitson, MD, PhD, Division of Cardiac Surgery, The Collaboration for Organ Perfusion, Protection, Engineering and Regeneration (COPPER) Laboratory, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, N-813 Doan Hall, 410 W. 10th Ave., Columbus, OH 43210, United States. bryan.whitson@osumc.edu
Telephone: +1-614-3667414 Fax: +1-614-2932020
Received: November 29, 2013
Revised: January 14, 2014
Accepted: January 17, 2014
Published online: March 28, 2014
Abstract

Heart transplantation is commonplace, the supply is limited. Many exciting changes in the field of mechanical circulatory support have occurred in the past few years, including the axial flow pump. Left ventricular assist device (LVAD) therapy is ever evolving. As the use of LVAD therapy increases it is important to understand the indications, surgical considerations and outcomes.

Keywords: Left ventricular assist device, Axial flow, Mechanical circulatory support, Heart failure, Continuous flow

Core tip: Left ventricular assist devices provide a durable, long-term alternative to heart transplant for those with end-stage heart failure. In an era of limited transplant donor supply, axial flow pumps are a viable alternative.