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World J Ophthalmol. Feb 12, 2014; 4(1): 1-6
Published online Feb 12, 2014. doi: 10.5318/wjo.v4.i1.1
Ocular damage secondary to lights and lasers: How to avoid and treat if necessary
Mohamed S Sayed, Marcus J Ko, Audrey C Ko, Wendy W Lee
Mohamed S Sayed, Marcus J Ko, Audrey C Ko, Wendy W Lee, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL 33136, United States
Author contributions: Lee WW contributed to design and final approval; Sayed MS contributed to writing of the manuscript; Ko MJ and Ko AC contributed to critical revision.
Correspondence to: Wendy W Lee, MD, Associate Professor of Clinical Ophthalmology, Oculofacial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Orbit and Oncology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, 900 NW 17th Street, Miami, FL 33136, United States. wlee@med.miami.edu
Telephone: +1-305-3266434 Fax: +1-305-3266443
Received: October 31, 2013
Revised: January 7, 2014
Accepted: January 17, 2014
Published online: February 12, 2014
Core Tip

Core tip: The selection of the appropriate laser safety eyewear (LSE) and eye shields while performing laser and/or light therapy to the face and periocular region may, among other precautionary measures, prevent the occurrence of ocular complications that can sometimes be severe and even blinding. Since LSE is specific for each particular wavelength, extreme caution should be exercised to avoid selecting the inappropriate LSE. The choice of external or corneal shields for the protection of the patient’s eyes depends on the particular area to be treated.