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World J Cardiol. Jul 26, 2014; 6(7): 517-530
Published online Jul 26, 2014. doi: 10.4330/wjc.v6.i7.517
Antihypertensive drugs and glucose metabolism
Christos V Rizos, Moses S Elisaf
Christos V Rizos, Moses S Elisaf, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
Author contributions: Rizos CV and Elisaf MS contributed equally to this paper.
Correspondence to: Moses S Elisaf, MD, FASA, FRSH, Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, Ipiros, 45110 Ioannina, Greece. egepi@cc.uoi.gr
Telephone: +30-26510-07509 Fax: +30-26510-07016
Received: December 20, 2013
Revised: March 23, 2014
Accepted: May 14, 2014
Published online: July 26, 2014
Core Tip

Core tip: Hypertension is a major contributor to the development and progression of cardiovascular disease. Increased blood pressure often coexists with insulin resistance. The various antihypertensive drugs have different effect on glucose metabolism. Indeed, angiotensin receptor blockers as well as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors have been associated with beneficial effects on glucose homeostasis. Calcium channel blockers are considered to have neutral metabolic effects. On the other hand, diuretics and β-blockers have an overall disadvantageous effect on glucose metabolism. As a result the metabolic effects of the various blood pressure lowering drugs should be taken into account when selecting an antihypertensive treatment.