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World J Gastrointest Endosc. Mar 16, 2019; 11(3): 209-218
Published online Mar 16, 2019. doi: 10.4253/wjge.v11.i3.209
Simulation in endoscopy: Practical educational strategies to improve learning
Rishad Khan, Michael A Scaffidi, Samir C Grover, Nikko Gimpaya, Catharine M Walsh
Rishad Khan, Department of Medicine, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London ON N6A 5C1, Canada
Rishad Khan, Michael A Scaffidi, Samir C Grover, Nikko Gimpaya, Division of Gastroenterology, St. Michael’s Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5B 1W8, Canada
Rishad Khan, Michael A Scaffidi, Samir C Grover, Nikko Gimpaya, Department of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5G 2C4, Canada
Michael A Scaffidi, Faculty of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Queen’s University, Kingston ON K7L 3N6, Canada
Catharine M Walsh, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the Research and Learning Institutes, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5G 1X8, Canada
Catharine M Walsh, Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5G 1X8, Canada
Catharine M Walsh, The Wilson Centre, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto ON M5G 2C4, Canada
Author contributions: All authors contributed to design and planning, critical revision of manuscript for important intellectual content and approval of final version of manuscript; Khan R and Walsh CM contributed to drafting of the manuscript.
Conflict-of-interest statement: Rishad Khan has received research funding from AbbVie, Ferring Pharmaceuticals, and Pendopharm. Samir C Grover has received research funding from AbbVie and Janssen and personal fees from AbbVie, Takeda, and Ferring, and is owner, and holds shares, in Volō Healthcare. All other authors have no conflicts of interest to disclose.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article which was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution Non Commercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Corresponding author: Catharine M Walsh, FRCPC, MD, PhD, Clinician Scientist, Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and the Research and Learning Institutes, Hospital for Sick Children, University of Toronto, SickKids PGCRL, 686 Bay St., Room 11.9719, Toronto M5G 1X8, ON, Canada. catharine.walsh@utoronto.ca
Telephone: +1-416-813-7654 x309432
Received: February 12, 2019
Peer-review started: February 14, 2019
First decision: February 26, 2019
Revised: March 6, 2019
Accepted: March 11, 2019
Article in press: March 11, 2019
Published online: March 16, 2019
Core Tip

Core tip: In gastrointestinal endoscopy, simulation-based training has been shown to improve learning outcomes and performance in the clinical setting and offers unique advantages to trainees and educators. Four best practices, which are grounded in evidence and can help maximize the learning benefits of simulation-based training, are deliberate practice with mastery learning, feedback and debriefing, contextual learning, and innovative educational strategies.