Review
Copyright ©The Author(s) 2020. Published by Baishideng Publishing Group Inc. All rights reserved.
World J Gastroenterol. Jun 7, 2020; 26(21): 2758-2767
Published online Jun 7, 2020. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v26.i21.2758
Vaccine therapy for dysbiosis-related diseases
Kosuke Fujimoto, Satoshi Uematsu
Kosuke Fujimoto, Satoshi Uematsu, Department of Immunology and Genomics, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka 545-8585, Japan
Kosuke Fujimoto, Satoshi Uematsu, Division of Innate Immune Regulation, International Research and Development Center for Mucosal Vaccines, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan
Kosuke Fujimoto, Satoshi Uematsu, Division of Metagenome Medicine, Human Genome Center, The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan
Satoshi Uematsu, Collaborative Research Institute for Innovative Microbiology, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8654, Japan
Author contributions: Fujimoto K and Uematsu S wrote the paper.
Supported by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology of Japan (Grant-in-Aid for Early-Career Scientists), No. 19K17932 (To Fujimoto K).
Conflict-of-interest statement: The authors declare no conflicts of interest.
Open-Access: This article is an open-access article that was selected by an in-house editor and fully peer-reviewed by external reviewers. It is distributed in accordance with the Creative Commons Attribution NonCommercial (CC BY-NC 4.0) license, which permits others to distribute, remix, adapt, build upon this work non-commercially, and license their derivative works on different terms, provided the original work is properly cited and the use is non-commercial. See: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
Corresponding author: Satoshi Uematsu, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Immunology and Genomics, Osaka City University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-4-3 Asahi-machi, Abeno-ku, Osaka 545-8585, Japan. uematsu.satoshi@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp
Received: December 27, 2019
Peer-review started: December 27, 2019
First decision: February 14, 2020
Revised: March 27, 2020
Accepted: May 23, 2020
Article in press: May 23, 2020
Published online: June 7, 2020
Core Tip

Core tip: How to control intestinal pathogenic bacteria that mediate multifactorial diseases is a major concern worldwide. There are few methods for controlling only intestinal pathogenic bacteria; therefore, we have developed a prime–boost type, next-generation mucosal vaccine, and have used it for control of bacterial intestinal diseases. This vaccine can contribute to prevention of Clostridium ramosum-mediated obesity. Thus, this approach might be useful for protecting against microbe-associated disorders of the intestine.