Brief Article
Copyright ©2012 Baishideng Publishing Group Co., Limited. All rights reserved.
World J Gastroenterol. Jul 14, 2012; 18(26): 3420-3425
Published online Jul 14, 2012. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v18.i26.3420
Safety and effectiveness of propofol sedation during and after outpatient colonoscopy
Akira Horiuchi, Yoshiko Nakayama, Masashi Kajiyama, Naoyuki Kato, Tetsuya Kamijima, Yasuyuki Ichise, Naoki Tanaka
Akira Horiuchi, Yoshiko Nakayama, Masashi Kajiyama, Naoyuki Kato, Tetsuya Kamijima, Yasuyuki Ichise, Naoki Tanaka, Digestive Disease Center, Showa Inan General Hospital, Komagane 399-4117, Japan
Yoshiko Nakayama, Department of Pediatrics, Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan
Naoki Tanaka, Department of Metabolic Regulation, Shinshu University Graduate School of Medicine, Matsumoto 390-8621, Japan
Author contributions: Horiuchi A, Nakayama Y, Kajiyama M, Kato N, Kamijima T and Ichise Y acquired the data; Horiuchi A and Tanaka N analyzed and interpreted the data; Horiuchi A drafted the manuscript; Horiuchi A, Nakayama Y, Kajiyama M, Kato N, Kamijima T, Ichise Y and Tanaka N revised the manuscript and gave final approval of the version to be published.
Correspondence to: Akira Horiuchi, MD, Digestive Disease Center, Showa Inan General Hospital, 3230 Akaho, Komagane 399-4117, Japan. horiuchi.akira@sihp.jp
Telephone: +81-265-822121 Fax: + 81-265-822118
Received: August 26, 2011
Revised: April 5, 2012
Accepted: April 22, 2012
Published online: July 14, 2012
Abstract

AIM: To study the safety and effectiveness of propofol sedation for outpatient colonoscopy.

METHODS: Propofol was given by bolus injection with an age-adjusted standard protocol consisting of 60 mg for patients < 70 years old, 40 mg for patients age 70-89 years, and 20 mg for those ≥ 90 years, and additional injections of 20 mg propofol were given up to a maximum of 200 mg. The principal parameters were the occurrence of adverse events within 24 h after colonoscopy and overall satisfaction for this procedure. Secondary parameters included successful procedure, respiratory depression, and other complications.

RESULTS: Consecutive patients were entered prospectively and all 2101 entered successfully completed outpatient colonoscopy. The mean dose of propofol used was 96.4 mg (range 40-200 mg). Younger patients required higher doses of propofol than older patients (20-40 years vs≥ 61 years: 115.3 ± 32 mg vs 89.7 ± 21 mg, P < 0.001). Transient supplemental oxygen supply was needed by five patients (0.2%); no other complications occurred. The questionnaires were completed by 1820 (87%) of 2101 patients and most rated their overall satisfaction as excellent (80%) or good (17%). The majority (65%) of patients drove home or to their office after their colonoscopy. Most (99%) were willing to repeat the same procedure. No incidents occurred within 24 h after colonoscopy.

CONCLUSION: Propofol sedation using a dose < 200 mg proved both safe and practical for outpatient colonoscopy.

Keywords: Colonoscopy, Propofol, Colorectal cancer