Review
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World J Gastroenterol. Sep 21, 2006; 12(35): 5611-5621
Published online Sep 21, 2006. doi: 10.3748/wjg.v12.i35.5611
Upper gastrointestinal function and glycemic control in diabetes mellitus
Reawika Chaikomin, Christopher K Rayner, Karen L Jones, Michael Horowitz
Reawika Chaikomin, Christopher K Rayner, Karen L Jones, Michael Horowitz, University of Adelaide Department of Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia
Author contributions: All authors contributed equally to the work.
Correspondence to: Dr. Chris Rayner, Department of Medicine, Royal Adelaide Hospital, North Terrace, Adelaide, South Australia 5000, Australia. chris.rayner@adelaide.edu.au
Telephone: +61-8-8222291 Fax: +61-8-82233870
Received: May 19, 2006
Revised: June 6, 2006
Accepted: June 16, 2006
Published online: September 21, 2006
Abstract

Recent evidence has highlighted the impact of glycemic control on the incidence and progression of diabetic micro- and macrovascular complications, and on cardiovascular risk in the non-diabetic population. Postprandial blood glucose concentrations make a major contribution to overall glycemic control, and are determined in part by upper gastrointestinal function. Conversely, poor glycemic control has an acute, reversible effect on gastrointestinal motility. Insights into the mechanisms by which the gut contributes to glycemia have given rise to a number of novel dietary and pharmacological strategies designed to lower postprandial blood glucose concentrations.

Keywords: Blood glucose, Diabetes mellitus, Gastric Emptying, Gastrointestinal motility, Hyperglycemia